Increased Precautions We're Taking in Response to COVID-19
As updates on the impact of the coronavirus continue to be released, we want to take a moment to inform you of the heightened preventative measures we have put in place at McCallum Place Eating Disorder Center to keep our patients, their families, and our employees safe. All efforts are guided by and in adherence to the recommendations distributed by the CDC.

Please note that for the safety of our patients, their families, and our staff, on-site visitation is no longer allowed at McCallum Place Eating Disorder Center.

  • This restriction has been implemented in compliance with updated corporate and state regulations to further reduce the risks associated with COVID-19.
  • We are offering visitation through telehealth services so that our patients can remain connected to their loved ones.
  • Alternate methods of communication for other services are being vetted and may be offered when deemed clinically appropriate.

For specific information regarding these changes and limitations, please contact us directly.

CDC updates are consistently monitored to ensure that all guidance followed is based on the latest information released.

  • All staff has received infection prevention and control training.
  • Thorough disinfection and hygiene guidance has been provided.
  • Patient care supplies such as masks and hand sanitizer are being monitored and utilized.
  • Temperature and symptom screening protocols are in place for all patients and staff.
  • Social distancing strategies have been implemented to ensure that patients and staff maintain proper distance from one another at all times.
  • Cleaning service contracts have been reviewed for additional support.
  • Personal protective equipment items are routinely checked to ensure proper and secure storage.
  • CDC informational posters are on display to provide important reminders on proper infection prevention procedures.
  • We are in communication with our local health department to receive important community-specific updates.

The safety of our patients, their families, and our employees is our top priority, and we will remain steadfast in our efforts to reduce any risk associated with COVID-19.

The CDC has provided a list of easy tips that can help prevent the spread of the coronavirus.

  • Avoid close contact with people who are sick.
  • Cover your cough or sneeze with a tissue and then immediately dispose of the tissue.
  • Avoid touching your eyes, nose, and mouth.
  • Clean and disinfect objects and surfaces that are frequently touched.
  • Wash your hands often with soap and water for at least 20 seconds.
  • Stay home when you are sick, except to get medical care.

For detailed information on COVID-19, please visit https://www.cdc.gov/coronavirus/2019-ncov/index.html

Blog

Category: expressive therapy

Moving Toward Recovery II

Caroline H Leibman, MA Ed, BC-DMT, NCC, SEP Individual Therapist; Dance & Movement, Expressive & Psychodrama Group Therapist   In my previous blog I shared the important role of the Creative Arts therapies in Eating Disorders treatment. I cited Dance/Movement Therapy, Authentic Movement, Somatic Experiencing, Yoga Therapy and Mindful Walking as specific therapies and/or body-based … Read More

Moving Toward Recovery

Caroline Leibman, MA, NCC, BC-DMT, SEP Individual Therapist; Dance & Movement, Expressive & Psychodrama Group Therapist Movement is our first language. Before we had access to language we spoke with our bodies. We used gesture, posture and sound to communicate our wants and needs. If you have been around an infant or toddler lately you … Read More

Ecotherapy with Eating Disorders

Written by Cliff Hamrick, LPC, McCallum Place Austin In his book, Biophilia (1984), biologist E. O. Wilson suggested the biophilia hypothesis, which states that humans have a natural affinity towards other living systems. These living systems include large systems such as forests, oceans, and fields, but can also include smaller systems such as leaves, feathers, … Read More

Dance Movement Therapy

Written by Daisy Thompson, LMSW, LCDC-I “Dance first. Think later. It’s the natural order.” -Samuel Becket According to the American Dance Therapy Association (ADTA) dance movement therapy (DMT) is a well-established psychotherapeutic intervention which is based on the empirically supported concept that body, mind, and spirit are interconnected, and that the psychotherapeutic use of movement … Read More

Healing Self Judgment with Improvisation

Written by Rachel Makorsky, LCSW, Therapist at McCallum Place Austin Many of us have experienced self-judgment and self-critical thinking. It does not feel good. For clients suffering from an eating disorder, self-judgment can be a common challenge. Currently at McCallum Place Austin, we facilitate an innovative group called “Therapeutic Improvisation.” The rules, skills and lessons … Read More

Expressive Therapy, the Brain and Eating Disorder Recovery, Part 3

by Caroline Leibman, MA, BC-DMT, NCC Authentic Movement Authentic Movement is another expressive therapy group which offers a self-directed form of moving that invites a deep attunement to and dwelling within the body. Patients are invited to close their eyes and follow movement impulses, as well as stillness that arises in the here and now. … Read More

Expressive Therapy, the Brain and Eating Disorder Recovery, Part 2

by Caroline Leibman, MA, BC-DMT, NCC Three types of expressive therapy we utilize for treating eating disorders include Dance/Movement Therapy, Authentic Movement, and Psychodrama groups. As we discussed in the last blog post, these offer unique benefits to the brain which are essential to recovery from an eating disorder. What follows is description of each … Read More

Expressive Therapy, the Brain and Eating Disorder Recovery, Part 1

by Caroline Leibman, MA, BC-DMT, NCC Expressive therapy groups are alive and well at McCallum Place and Cedar Springs Austin and available as an adjunct to our core evidence based treatments. They focus on bringing our patients with eating disorders into balanced and integrative healing. Current research in neuroscience points out that therapeutic interventions must … Read More