McCallum Place | Eating Disorder Blog

Eating Disorders in the School Setting

Julie Rami, M.A. Ed., B.S. Spec. Ed.
McCallum Place Teacher

Nancy Anderson, B.S. Ed.
McCallum Place Teacher

Many times an educator is the first person who notices some of the warning signs of an
eating order. Think of all the time that a student spends in a classroom setting and how
many different people consistently see them everyday. This may be the core classroom
teachers, the PE teacher, the school counselor and the nurse. So, what are the signs
that these individuals should be looking out for?

What does an eating disorder look like in the classroom?

A student can be tired, have low energy, lack of motivation and drive that was
previously there, high levels of distractibility, irritability, constant movement,
forgetfulness, and overall just drastic physical changes. They might start missing a lot of school as they are just too tired to get up or just may truly not feel well. Missing
assignments start piling up because they don’t have the energy or concentration to
complete them. Then, inevitably, this leads to a change in overall performance and
grades will drop.

What does an eating disorder look like among the peer group and social
interactions?

Often isolation is the first outward sign of an ED amongst teenagers. A change in social
habits can look like a child pulling away from the peer group and not engaging in the
social patterns they previously enjoyed. They can isolate themselves as the eating
disorder worsens as a means to hide their behaviors. At times, the patient can feel
rejected or alienated when peers express concerns over their eating habits. Sometimes
the ED has been precipitated by teasing and comments from peers. Other times, what
starts as an attempt at improving health with diet and exercise gets out of hand but
initially the body changes are reinforced through praise. Social media can play a
negative role in the validating of disordered eating and body image. Parents should
always be aware of their child’s presence and identity on all social media outlets.

What does an eating disorder look like from a nurse’s point of view?

A student that struggles with an eating disorder may be a frequent visitor to the school
nurse. Their symptoms can include complaints of nausea after eating small or normal
amounts, bloating or water retention not attributable to other physical problems,
constipation, reflux, chronic sore throat, swelling of glands around the jaws, frequent
and unusual dental problems, general complaints of lightheadedness, fainting and
frequently feeling cold.

What does an eating disorder look like on the sports field in and out of school?

This is a student athlete that is “practicing” or “training” for several hours a day and
often secretive about their workouts. They can be quite rigid and compulsive with their
drive to perfection. These students will find a reason to avoid eating with the team and
will be averse to resting, rehydrating and refueling their bodies. They are at a higher risk for stress fractures and also can exhibit dizziness, weakness, fainting and weight loss. Their declining performance should be a red flag to those adults around them.
An eating disorder takes on many different faces, but if everyone is aware of these
signs and symptoms then help can be sought sooner than later.

Grieving the Loss of the Symptom

Tina Villalobos, MSW, LMSW

Therapist

As a therapist who works with people with eating disorders, I am regularly exposed to the tremendous angst and confusion people feel when wrestling with the possibility of recovery. It is no mystery that this process is a difficult one, a journey that can be fraught with back and forth, yes and no, “I guess recovery is worth it but maybe it’s not”. Patients often speak of the great cost it would be to give up their eating disorder. There is a feeling that recovery entails the loss of something dear. On the other hand, I have also talked a lot with patients about what they miss from their life without their eating disorder, what they’d hope to regain, and what they’ll miss out on if they continue acting through their symptoms. Time and again, patients respond with creative and inspired dreams for themselves, but there is doubt that these dreams will be realized if they remain committed to their eating disorder. They are aware of the great cost of their eating disorder, yet this knowledge is rarely enough to allow them to whole-heartedly choose recovery.

I think there are many reasons for this, but I’d like to focus on one that I’ve wondered about recently. I stumbled upon this idea when I was in a training class about how to work with dreams in psychotherapy. There are many theories about dreams that are out there, with perhaps the most famous being Freud’s theory that all dreams display, in disguised form, an unconscious wish. More recently, the interplay between psychoanalysis and neurobiology has been explored and one theorist, Mark Blechner, proposes a theory about dreams that seems quite salient when working with eating disorder patients. Blechner suggests the idea that “Dreams may express things that are not expressible by any other means” which is to say that dreams are their own language. Blechner encourages the therapist to think about how dreams express things from the patient’s mind that couldn’t be fully stated or understood with words. Dreams themselves are the language, and they aren’t comprised of syntax and sentence structure, and when we try to understand dreams through words, they lose some of their meaning. Speaking the dream requires that the dreamer squeeze a multilayered, multidimensional concept through the confining constraints of a series of words.   There’s a loss involved.

There is a parallel, it seems, between this understanding of dreams and how we might understand a patient’s eating disorder symptoms. Like the dream, when we try to understand the meaning of the symptom through words, the symptom loses its perfection, its completeness, and its mystique. Therapists and patients together might conceptualize the symptom as meaning x, y, and z. For example, restricting one’s food intake could signify the expression of one’s anger, one’s loss of self, and one’s need for independence, and usually much more, all at the same time. And all of that would be true. Through the laconic nature of a symptom, a complexity is wrapped up into one nice, neat behavior. The language of the symptom is brimming with action, affect, metaphor, thought, memory, or even trauma—all of which makes the symptom extremely powerful. The symptom is saying the unsayable, not necessarily because all of that can’t be said (though in some cases, like with trauma, that is the case), but because all of that can’t be said at the same time without missing some of the meaning.

It’s important to think about the contribution of therapy to this reduction of meaning. In therapy, the patient begins the process of giving structured meaning, through words, to the symptom. Inevitably, a reduction occurs. When the patient chooses to not act on their eating disorder, but talk about it instead in therapy, they lose the symptom’s powerful language, which is also to lose the mysterious, elusive, symbolic, controlling, and silent nature of the symptom. Like dreams, speaking in words is not the primary language of the symptom. Any verbalization of the meaning of the symptom is a translation, and it’s a translation that can force mediocrity. Something is lost.

This is one reason why I think the addition of other types of therapy, not just talk therapy, can be so beneficial to the process of healing that occurs in recovery from an eating disorder. Non-verbal forms of therapy, such as art, dance, or music, provide an excellent forum for this complexity to be communicated in other ways than through the symptom. But I also think that this loss of meaning is something that us “talk therapists” should try to be keenly aware of. When a patient chooses recovery, there is an entirely new world to be gained, but there is also loss. When we think of recovery, it can be easy to envision the positive—the possibilities, the health, the connection to one’s self and to others. But when a symptom as powerful as not eating, for example, is forgone, in a sense, the patient is losing a language, which is to say she’ll be losing a treasured part of herself. She knows herself through this language. She understands the world through this language. It would be quite strange if she were not ambivalent about giving this up.

Recovery from an eating disorder is a long and involved process and it is nothing new to say that grief is a part of this process. What I’ve considered here is the grief that may need to be processed around the loss of the language of the symptom and what that means for the patient’s commitment to therapy and to recovery. Perhaps if this loss of language, and all that goes with it, is understood, named, and worked through, the patient might be more able to look for other, more adaptive ways, of communicating her complexities to herself and to the world.

McCallum Place is a nationally recognized, comprehensive eating disorder treatment center for adolescents and adults. The facility was founded in St. Louis and has opened an additional center in the Greater Kansas City area. Each clinic offers on-site medical and psychiatric management combined with intensive, individualized psychotherapy. McCallum Place’s eating disorder treatment programs provide a continuum of care, specialized to provide the right level of support to optimize recovery for each patient.

“Eating Clean”: When Food Decisions Become Messy

Kelsey Horton, MS, RD, LD

Dietitian

If you happen to have a Facebook, Twitter or Instagram account, you have probably heard of the term “clean eating”. Maybe more commonly #cleaneating. What does “clean” mean? It depends who you ask. Vegans and vegetarians will tell you that meat and animal products (respectively) are “unclean”. Our paleo friends cringe at the notion of grains, legumes, dairy, refined oils, added salt, sugar, alcohol, and some vegetables. Low carb dieters live and die by the nutrition label. And even Uncle Sam (USDA) will shake his finger at us for saturated fat, cholesterol, red meat, and added sugar on our plates. To our patients with eating disorders, eating “clean” serves as yet another set of food rules to live by.

The one thing that all of them agree on is that there are “good foods” and “bad foods”. But what would constitute branding a scarlet “B” on certain foods? One could argue that “bad foods:

  • Put you at more risk for a caloric excess.
  • Disrupt the nutrient density of your diet.
  • Cause specific diseases, aging or a change in body composition.

Are these legitimate concerns? Of course, but I would challenge you to consider the following:

  • Just because you can overeat, doesn’t mean you will.
  • Foods don’t CAUSE nutrient deficiencies and if you are consuming an adequate amount per day, deficiencies are actually quite rare.
  • Any food can be dangerous at a certain amount but no one food inherently threatens your health in the context of a mixed diet.

This idea of “eating clean” is not coming from hard science, it is a cultural trend that serves to demonstrate someone’s personal food belief system… and of course, preach it as the all-powerful approach to avoiding what “bad foods” can do to you. Eating “clean” isn’t an instruction manual on how to eat healthy. It’s a sermon on the “shoulds” and “should-nots” when it comes to eating.

For those who struggle with orthorexia, a quest to eat “clean” intensifies an already dysfunctional relationship with food. It interferes with brain-space otherwise occupied by their ambitions, family life, vacations or day-to-day mood. All the while, they are using the scapegoat of “it’s the healthy choice” to justify bringing their own food to a restaurant or going hungry on a road trip rather than stopping for fast food.

Orthorexia becomes insidious due to this convenient excuse of “healthy” or “clean” food decisions. It goes unnoticed or worse yet, encouraged. It isn’t about blaming healthy food though. It is about when the desire to eat healthy takes away from the other aspects of a person’s life. Next time you hear about the latest and greatest #foodtrend, think to yourself: is this in line with my food beliefs or does it just sound glamorous? #clean

McCallum Place is a nationally recognized, comprehensive eating disorder treatment center for adolescents and adults. The facility was founded in St. Louis and has opened an additional center in the Greater Kansas City area. Each clinic offers on-site medical and psychiatric management combined with intensive, individualized psychotherapy. McCallum Place’s eating disorder treatment programs provide a continuum of care, specialized to provide the right level of support to optimize recovery for each patient.

Lovingkindness: A Tool for Cultivating Connection, Compassion, and Happiness

Darby McBride, MA, LPC, NCC, CCTP

Individual and Group Therapist

My best mornings before coming to work include some type of meditation. This is a time when I can center myself before the start of a busy day. Do I make time for it every day? No. Sometimes I don’t get up early enough to include it in my morning routine. Sometimes there is just too much to do. But when I’m able to add it in, I feel much more at peace.

Whether or not I’ve meditated beforehand, I come in to work at McCallum Place on Monday mornings and lead home group. This is a group where patients get to check in about their day. They can talk about challenges they are facing, emotions they are experiencing, hopes and dreams for recovery, and anything else that surfaces. After home group, I start meeting with my individual patients. Throughout the day I am engaged with patients: listening to their stories, providing emotional support, and working to help them look at their illness and the recovery process in new ways. This is what I love about being a therapist.

However, I have to admit that one of the hard things about being a therapist is sitting across from these patients who are so bright, talented, and caring and hearing them putting themselves down, expecting perfection from themselves, and struggling to identify and acknowledge all of their positive qualities that seem as plain as day to me. This brings me back to my original topic: meditation.

Specifically, I want to talk about lovingkindness meditation. You may be thinking, “Lovingkindness? What’s that? It sounds too new age-y for me.” Let me explain. Lovingkindness (also known as “metta”) meditation is about creating an intention in our mind for the happiness of ourselves and all beings (Salzberg, 1995). By practicing this type of meditation we are planting seeds of love and happiness for ourselves and others.

The Practice

Before we can sit down to meditate, we need to come up with specific phrases for ourselves and others to repeat in our meditation. Our goal is to identify meaningful phrases that we wish for ourselves and for others. Each phrase will start with “May I…”, “May you…”, or “May all beings…” Some examples include “May I be safe”, “May I be happy”, “May I be healthy”, and “May I feel at peace.” Use these phrases or come up with your own.

When we sit down to practice lovingkindness, we first want to offer the phrases to ourselves. So, as you sit or lie down comfortably, eyes open or closed, repeat silently to yourself either the above phrases or the unique phrases you have identified. And as you repeat them, put some intent behind them. Consider each repetition of the phrases a gift you are giving to yourself. Repeat them at a gentle pace, without rushing or adding extra pressure.

“May I be safe. May I be happy. May I be healthy. May I feel at peace.”

(If any strong feelings arise, practice breathing into and accepting them for what they are, and then return to the phrases.)

Once we have spent a few minutes on ourselves, we can then direct our phrases of lovingkindness to someone we feel close to or inspired by. We will want to choose at least one person. If we choose more than one person, we will want to take time silently repeating the phrases for each person individually. If you cannot think of a person, perhaps you can direct the phrases to a pet!

First, picture this individual’s face, say his or her name to yourself, and connect with what it feels like to be in his or her presence (Salzberg, 2011). Then, with clear intention, offer the phrases of lovingkindness to this individual.

“May you be safe. May you be happy. May you be healthy. May you feel at peace.”

Next, we are going to offer lovingkindness to someone we know who is struggling or hurting right now. As before, we want to picture his or her face, say his or her name, and connect to his or her presence. As we do this, we begin repeating the phrases again.

“May you be safe. May you be happy. May you be healthy. May you feel at peace.”

(If at any point, you become distracted, return to the phrases and continue.)

Next, we want to choose someone that we don’t know well but that we may encounter occasionally. Maybe it’s the mail carrier, a cashier at the grocery store, or a neighbor. Our intent is not to get to know this person better, but rather, to offer him or her phrases of lovingkindness. Remember, this person wants to be happy, just as we do.

The same process applies here. As we imagine this person’s face and connect to his or her presence, we offer our phrases.

“May you be safe. May you be happy. May you be healthy. May you feel at peace.”

(You may find if you do this enough that you begin to feel much more connected to this person, even though you don’t know him or her very well! Connection is a vital need we all share. Celebrate it!)

Now, for arguably the most difficult part of this meditation, we are going to identify a difficult person in our lives. We may want to choose someone who is easier to focus on when we are just starting out. For example, we may first think of a person who irritates us or gets under our skin rather than someone who has truly hurt us. We’re going to picture this person, say his or her name, and connect with his or her presence. Repeat the phrases of lovingkindness with intention.

“May you be safe. May you be happy. May you be healthy. May you feel at peace.”

(This may be hard. If you find that it’s too hard, go back to sending yourself lovingkindness for this part of the meditation.)

Finally, we want to offer lovingkindness to all beings. This includes anything that is living: people, animals, plants, insects…everything! Open up your heart and allow the phrases to flow out to the world.

“May all beings be safe. May all beings be happy. May all beings be healthy. May all beings feel at peace.”

(At first, it may feel overwhelming trying to include all beings. Take it easy on yourself and do the best you can. It will start to feel more natural with time.)

Why Should I Practice?

If we spend a few minutes on each part of the meditation, we will reap the benefits of lovingkindness. Lovingkindness breeds compassion, joy, and equanimity (Salzberg, 1995). In practicing this specific type of meditation, we are increasing self-respect and respect for others and kindness. If we practice regularly, lovingkindness can change our relationship with ourselves in a very positive way. We may find that our relationships with others benefit from this practice as well. The Buddha taught that lovingkindness brings additional advantages to our lives, such as sleeping easily, waking easily, gaining the love of others, and having a peaceful, serene mind (Salzberg, 1995).

If you practice this meditation regularly, you may find that you can more easily connect with others throughout the day. You may find yourself repeating the phrases even when you are not meditating, allowing for more spontaneous self-compassion and generosity.

For those with eating disorders, it can be extremely beneficial to take time out of each day to breathe and practice offering lovingkindness. This practice cultivates patience and acceptance, while also wishing well for ourselves and others. It is like a blessing or a gift we can give to ourselves. I find that many of my patients struggle to take time for themselves and don’t often take care of themselves in the same way that they tend to take care of others. Practicing lovingkindness can be a positive and uplifting way to start your day. It also provides a reprieve from eating disorder thoughts, behaviors, and motivations and may provide the opportunity to see the bigger picture of life, outside of the eating disorder. This is all in addition to feeling more connected with others and our authentic selves.

It may seem like meditation takes a lot of time and dedication for us to see the full benefits. However, with lovingkindness, I have received benefits after just ten minutes of practice in a day. For me, it’s a hopeful beginning or peaceful end to the day. When I use the phrases throughout the day, I find that I feel more grounded and less stressed or anxious. Take some time to experiment and to recognize the benefits lovingkindness may give to you. All you need is ten minutes!

References:

Salzberg, S. (1995). Loving-Kindness: The Revolutionary Art of Happiness. Boston, MA: Shambhala Publications, Inc.

Salzberg, S. (2011). Real Happiness: The Power of Meditation. New York, NY: Workman Publishing Company, Inc.

 

McCallum Place is a nationally recognized, comprehensive eating disorder treatment center for adolescents and adults. The facility was founded in St. Louis and has opened an additional center in the Greater Kansas City area. Each clinic offers on-site medical and psychiatric management combined with intensive, individualized psychotherapy. McCallum Place’s eating disorder treatment programs provide a continuum of care, specialized to provide the right level of support to optimize recovery for each patient.

What is Recovery?

Lindsey Herzog MSW, LCSW

Assistant Clinical Director/Therapist

Eating disorders have the highest mortality rate of any psychiatric illness. Despite this, many people are anxious and resistant to getting help and/or to coming in to treatment for their eating disorder. The treatment and recovery process is long and difficult for most. During this time, many people ask themselves “what is recovery,” “what does recovery look like,” and “can I achieve recovery or will I be forced to hold on to my eating disorder?”

The reality is there is no defined or “right” way to view recovery from an eating disorder. Recovery looks different and means different things to each person. Often times, people view recovery on a continuum. That is, some people view themselves to be in recovery if they are refraining from active eating disorder behaviors such as bingeing, purging, compulsive exercise, and food restriction but still struggle greatly with ED thoughts. Other people view themselves to be in recovery only if they are able to refrain from ED behaviors and report an absence of ED thoughts and beliefs. Often times individuals work with a therapist, registered dietitian, and a psychiatrist to help them reach a level of sustainable recovery. Regardless of their time in recovery, some people choose to say they are “recovering” instead of saying they are “recovered.”

In order to assess where one is at in the recovery process, ask yourself the following questions: have I mastered the Stages of Change in the major areas of my eating disorder? The Stages of Change include: Pre-Contemplation: you do not believe you have a problem; Contemplation: you recognize you have a problem but you are not confident in your ability to change; Preparation: you have decided that you want to try to change and are willing to explore alternatives. You decide on a course of action; Action: you decided on treatment as your course of action and are fully committed to it despite the discomfort it likely will elicit for you; Maintenance: you completed treatment and are prepared to deal with times when urges arise; Termination: you have made sufficient gains to be completely confident in your ability to maintain the changes despite urges. Despite experiencing urges, you still make recovery choices, and use adaptive coping skills. In order to further assess for recovery, evaluate if you have the coping skills (mindfulness, emotion regulation, distress tolerance, interpersonal effectiveness), tools, and support necessary to maintain change. Ask yourself if you are aware of your triggers and if you have a relapse prevention plan in place should you start to struggle. Finally, ask yourself, (and honestly assess) if you would be willing to resume treatment in the future if indicated/needed.

Recovery comes in many different shapes and forms and is different for everyone. Although attaining recovery is difficult, it is possible with the right tools, knowledge, and determination.

Comments off of Recovered versus Recovering by Julie Holland Faylor, MHS, CEDS.

Eating Disorder Recovery and Healthy Sexuality

Jessica Juhnke MSW, LMSW

Therapist

Sexuality is a complex topic that includes everything from our physical development to the people we choose to date. It is a difficult topic to define, and includes the way we interact with not only ourselves but other people in our lives with who we choose to share intimate experiences. Healthy sexuality includes being aware of your own needs, wants, and desires while also having the ability to share these with individuals who make you feel safe and valued.

Defining and expressing healthy sexuality can be difficult for anyone, regardless of whether or not you have an eating disorder. However individuals with eating disorders often share common characteristics such as distorted body image, low self-esteem, perfectionism, and shame that can become a barrier to healthy sexuality. In order for those with eating disorders to experience healthy sexuality, there are several components that must be in place.

1) Safety: Part of recovery from an eating disorder involves working towards the ability to feel safe in your own body. This same idea also applies to healthy sexuality. Feeling safe within your own body is a key part of finding comfort and pleasure in an intimate experience. This is often a difficult goal to accomplish for individuals who struggle with issues such as perfectionism, distorted body image, or discomfort in their bodies. Therefore, addressing these issues in treatment is an essential part of working towards healthy sexuality in the future.

2) Trust: Healthy sexuality involves being able to trust your body, which is difficult for those with eating disorders who may have spent years disregarding important internal body cues. Another essential component of healthy sexuality involves being able to trust your own needs and desires, which is difficult for those whose thoughts and desires are currently driven by an eating disorder. Spending time in treatment learning to trust internal cues, thoughts, needs, and desires is a key part of developing healthy sexuality.

3) Addressing Past Trauma: Both sexual trauma and eating disorders often cause individuals to experience high levels of shame, guilt, and discomfort in their own bodies. Sexual trauma can also lead to dissociation, flashbacks, hypervigilance, and mental health issues that make recovery from an eating disorder difficult. For those with have a history of sexual trauma, recovery from an eating disorder may also include working with a therapist to address past trauma that may be impacting or creating barriers to the recovery process.

4) Addressing Physical Health: Medical issues that often accompany eating disorders can have an impact on sexuality. Body weight and nutrition have a direct impact on many of the hormones that affect sexuality and libido. Mental health issues that can accompany eating disorders can also impact one’s ability to develop healthy sexuality, as can some medications used to treat them. While addressing medical issues during treatment, individuals may begin to see changes in their thoughts, desires, and needs that relate to sexuality.

Recovering from an eating disorder isn’t easy. Recovering from an eating disorder while working to identify what healthy sexuality looks like to you can seem especially overwhelming. However, as one learns to become more comfortable in their body, trust their internal cues, and identify their needs or desires, beginning to develop a concept of healthy sexuality becomes an easier next step.

Fear Foods

Tara DeWitt MS, RDN, LD

Dietitian

If you eat fat, you will become fat. If you eat fried food, you will not only become fat, but will also develop acne. If you eat red meat or eggs, you will develop high cholesterol and die from a heart attack. Although these statements sound unreasonable to most, they are one of the biggest barriers patients with eating disorders must confront on their road to recovery. Food beliefs eliminate foods from the diet of a person suffering from an eating disorder. As a dietitian working with patients with eating disorders, I strive to challenge these messages so they can trust, and eventually, enjoy food again.

Fear foods mean exactly what they sound like, foods that one finds fearful. The specific foods that are feared are very case-dependent; perhaps it was a food associated with trauma, a food that wasn’t “allowed” at home, or was historically a binge food, making it impossible to eat again. An analogy I use when trying to educate a patient’s loved ones about fear foods, is to think of the one thing you are extremely afraid of, and imagine facing the fear 3-6 times each and every day. For example, I am terrified of spiders. If there is a spider in a room I have to enter, someone (NOT me) would have to a) kill the spider, b) remove the spider from said room, or c) demolish the building. Imagine how difficult it would be for me to enter the room, facing the tiny arachnid that has held me back from entering various rooms. Now imagine how difficult it is for a patient to face the thing that held them back from their lives. The supported meals and snacks at McCallum Place is the perfect environment to assist patients with challenging their fear foods, and the post-meal discussion helps them to process their challenges with their peers and meal therapists.

As dietitians, we often assign our patients the “Fear Foods Worksheet” that involves a patient writing out their fear foods on a scale from “safe” to “untouchable.” The meals and snacks provided at McCallum Place often include these fearful foods, and planning out these challenges with a patient can be the first step to confronting their fears. As time goes on and the exposures continue, the fear food slowly loses it’s power over a patient and can be eaten with far less anxiety and fear than it did before.

Another example on how we assist patients in challenging their fear foods is to write down the food, followed by the outcome they anticipate happening if it is consumed, regardless of how irrational it sounds. Let’s refer to my phobia of spiders for an example. My fear statement is: “I am afraid of spiders, if I go into a room with spiders, I will die.” A way for me to challenge my irrational thought would to be to have repetitive exposures that include spending time in a room with a spider, and slowly increase the duration of time spent in that room until I no longer hold the same fear about that specific spider. I quickly realize that I do not die if I walk into a room with a spider, although my anxiety levels may suggest otherwise, I would see that my irrational thoughts were holding me back. In eating disorders, when the fearful outcome of the food does not actually happen, it slowly becomes less scary. A person may be fearful of cookies, but know that they truly enjoy eating cookies. A fear statement could be, “I am afraid of cookies, I will gain 20 pounds if I eat cookies.” A way to challenge the irrational thought would be to include a cookie in that patients meal plan, and have them recognize that one cookie does not cause a 20 pound weight gain, and that it would be physically impossible to actually gain 20 pounds in one day (unless you developed another limb overnight…but I have yet to see that).

Challenging fear foods can be a terrifying process, and one that gets harder before it gets easier. Each patient is unique, which is why the individual treatment we provide at McCallum Place is the perfect environment to confront the fear foods. The sooner this occurs, the sooner food can be enjoyed once again.

Treating Eating Disorders: Anorexia  •  Bulimia  •  Binge Eating  •  Emotional Eating  •  Compulsive Exercising

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