Increased Precautions We're Taking in Response to the Coronavirus
As updates on the impact of the coronavirus continue to be released, we want to take a moment to inform you of the heightened preventative measures we have put in place at McCallum Place Eating Disorder Center to keep our patients, their families, and our employees safe. All efforts are guided by and in adherence to the recommendations distributed by the CDC.

Please note that for the safety of our patients, their families, and our staff, on-site visitation is no longer allowed at McCallum Place Eating Disorder Center.

  • This restriction has been implemented in compliance with updated corporate and state regulations to further reduce the risks associated with COVID-19.
  • We are offering visitation through telehealth services so that our patients can remain connected to their loved ones.
  • Alternate methods of communication for other services are being vetted and may be offered when deemed clinically appropriate.

For specific information regarding these changes and limitations, please contact us directly.

CDC updates are consistently monitored to ensure that all guidance followed is based on the latest information released.

  • All staff has received infection prevention and control training.
  • Thorough disinfection and hygiene guidance has been provided.
  • Patient care supplies such as masks and hand sanitizer are being monitored and utilized.
  • Temperature and symptom screening protocols are in place for all patients and staff.
  • Social distancing strategies have been implemented to ensure that patients and staff maintain proper distance from one another at all times.
  • Cleaning service contracts have been reviewed for additional support.
  • Personal protective equipment items are routinely checked to ensure proper and secure storage.
  • CDC informational posters are on display to provide important reminders on proper infection prevention procedures.
  • We are in communication with our local health department to receive important community-specific updates.

The safety of our patients, their families, and our employees is our top priority, and we will remain steadfast in our efforts to reduce any risk associated with COVID-19.

The CDC has provided a list of easy tips that can help prevent the spread of the coronavirus.

  • Avoid close contact with people who are sick.
  • Cover your cough or sneeze with a tissue and then immediately dispose of the tissue.
  • Avoid touching your eyes, nose, and mouth.
  • Clean and disinfect objects and surfaces that are frequently touched.
  • Wash your hands often with soap and water for at least 20 seconds.
  • Stay home when you are sick, except to get medical care.

For detailed information on COVID-19, please visit https://www.cdc.gov/coronavirus/2019-ncov/index.html

Blog

Eating Disorders and Sleep: Implications for Athlete Health and Performance

Eating disorders (ED) have a devastating impact on the health of athletes. EDs are often accompanied by medical complications including, but not limited to, disruption of cardiorespiratory, endocrine, neuropsychiatric, and gastrointestinal functioning. Collectively, the medical complications associated with low energy availability encompass a syndrome known as “Relative Energy Deficiency in Sport (RED-S)”. In addition to capturing the multitude of adverse health impacts, RED-S also highlights the ways in which sport performance may be impacted. For example, athletes with low energy availability may experience decreased muscle strength, endurance, coordination, and concentration, as well as increased risk for injury.

Sleep is another area of health that is commonly impacted, but overlooked, in athletes experiencing EDs. Athletes with EDs often have difficulties falling asleep, experience frequent nighttime awakenings, and short (insufficient) sleep. Research demonstrates that the relationship between EDs and poor sleep is bi-directional, meaning short sleep is a risk factor for the development of an ED and EDs are associated with greater vulnerability to sleep problems. In fact, research has indicated that insomnia is two times more likely to occur in women with an eating disorder diagnosis than the general population.

Short sleep alone is associated with detrimental consequences to some of the same bodily systems as EDs (e.g., neuropsychiatric, endocrine), and can have a profound adverse impact on sport performance. For example, athletes experiencing poor sleep are 1.7 times more likely to sustain an orthopedic injury. Similarly, tennis players experiencing sleep restriction have demonstrated reduced serving accuracy of approximately 15%. Moreover, athletes experiencing EDs exhibit tendencies to over-train, engage in compulsive exercise, and underutilize rest/recovery, further increasing risk for the compounded health impact associated with EDs and insufficient sleep. Including brief evidence-based behavioral sleep interventions (e.g., cognitive behavioral therapy for insomnia) to target disrupted sleep as an adjunct to ED treatment is likely to yield promising results for both ED recovery and long-term sleep health.

Click here to learn more about sleep and health among athletes.

About Ashley Brauer, PhD

Ashley Brauer is currently a therapist and post-doctoral psychology resident with The Victory Program, where she largely specializes in helping athletes navigate recovery from eating disorders. Dr. Brauer completed her master’s degree in sport and exercise psychology at Lund University (Sweden) and the University of Leipzig (Germany). She earned her Ph.D. in clinical psychology at Saint Louis University with an emphasis in sport psychology. Additionally, Dr. Brauer completed her APA-accredited pre-doctoral internship in the health psychology track at the Missouri Health Sciences Psychology Consortium. Broadly, Dr. Brauer’s clinical and research interests focus on the intersection of clinical health and performance psychology, including injury/illness, eating disorders, and sleep. Dr. Brauer is widely published and has presented at multiple national-level conferences.

View all posts by Ashley Brauer, PhD