Increased Precautions We're Taking in Response to COVID-19
As updates on the impact of the coronavirus continue to be released, we want to take a moment to inform you of the heightened preventative measures we have put in place at McCallum Place Eating Disorder Center to keep our patients, their families, and our employees safe. All efforts are guided by and in adherence to the recommendations distributed by the CDC.

Please note that for the safety of our patients, their families, and our staff, on-site visitation is no longer allowed at McCallum Place Eating Disorder Center.

  • This restriction has been implemented in compliance with updated corporate and state regulations to further reduce the risks associated with COVID-19.
  • We are offering visitation through telehealth services so that our patients can remain connected to their loved ones.
  • Alternate methods of communication for other services are being vetted and may be offered when deemed clinically appropriate.

For specific information regarding these changes and limitations, please contact us directly.

CDC updates are consistently monitored to ensure that all guidance followed is based on the latest information released.

  • All staff has received infection prevention and control training.
  • Thorough disinfection and hygiene guidance has been provided.
  • Patient care supplies such as masks and hand sanitizer are being monitored and utilized.
  • Temperature and symptom screening protocols are in place for all patients and staff.
  • Social distancing strategies have been implemented to ensure that patients and staff maintain proper distance from one another at all times.
  • Cleaning service contracts have been reviewed for additional support.
  • Personal protective equipment items are routinely checked to ensure proper and secure storage.
  • CDC informational posters are on display to provide important reminders on proper infection prevention procedures.
  • We are in communication with our local health department to receive important community-specific updates.

The safety of our patients, their families, and our employees is our top priority, and we will remain steadfast in our efforts to reduce any risk associated with COVID-19.

The CDC has provided a list of easy tips that can help prevent the spread of the coronavirus.

  • Avoid close contact with people who are sick.
  • Cover your cough or sneeze with a tissue and then immediately dispose of the tissue.
  • Avoid touching your eyes, nose, and mouth.
  • Clean and disinfect objects and surfaces that are frequently touched.
  • Wash your hands often with soap and water for at least 20 seconds.
  • Stay home when you are sick, except to get medical care.

For detailed information on COVID-19, please visit https://www.cdc.gov/coronavirus/2019-ncov/index.html

Blog

The lesser known eating disorder: Binge Eating Disorder

Written by Cherie Massmann, LPC, NCC

Due to the efforts of advocacy agencies attempting to raise awareness about the devastating effects, most people are familiar with the eating disorders of Anorexia Nervosa and Bulimia. All one would have to do is survey the landscape of popular women’s magazines to at least be exposed to these disorder in some way or another. What most people are unaware of is another very common eating disorder that plagues 30%-40% of patients in our society seeking weight loss, Binge Eating disorder. All eating disorders by their nature have elements of shame and secrecy associated with it. However, in my practice I find the patients suffering with binge eating disorder suffer from an extraordinary amount of shame and can interfere with and delay must needed treatment. Patients suffering from binge eating disorder find themselves eating what most would consider a usually large amount of food (usually 2-3 times the amount another person would eat) in a very rapid way, to the point of excessive fullness and in a secretive way. Those suffering with this disorder are not eating for enjoyment and typically report that they do not even taste the food that they are consuming. They do not have a “lack of willpower”, they are suffering from a very real eating disorder that requires treatment.

Often patients are slow to seek treatment because they are afraid of being judged or shamed by medical professional. Research suggests that their fears are justified as medical professionals have been shown to have biases about their overweight patients and their fears are often unjustified. Our goal at McCallum Place and Webster Wellness Professionals is to educate others on the prevalence of binge eating and to provide effective treatment for this disorder. We believe that the key to effective treatment is to remove the shame associated with eating and years of attempted diets and help patients trust in their ability to direct this area of their lives. We understand how very difficult it is to just pick up the phone and inquire about treatment or to walk into our office. This step alone can sometimes take months or years for the patient. However, when patients take this step, the staff here at McCallum Place and Webster Wellness Professionals is here to meet them where they are.

Learn more about the Greenlight Program at McCallum Place and Webster Wellness Professionals at 314-737-4070.

Cherie Massmann earned her Master’s degree in Counseling from Webster University in St. Louis, Missouri in 1999. Ms. Massmann is a member of the Webster Wellness Professionals outpatient multidisciplinary team.  She provides individual, family and group therapy for all aspects of eating disorders. Ms. Massmann is a cognitive-behaviorally trained therapist with over 12 years of experience treating binge eating disorder, anorexia nervosa, and obesity in adults and adolescents.  Prior to joining the Webster Wellness Professionals team she worked as a staff therapist in the Departments of Psychiatry and Internal Medicine at Washington University School of Medicine.  She has been the clinician of several multi-center National Institute of Health grants including: the Treatment Options for Type 2 Diabetes in Adolescents and Youth (TODAY study), the Comprehensive Maintenance